pictorial history


M.L. Shaw Jr. and Ernest Gunther 1918 – This is the oldest image we have of the farm.


M.L. Shaw 1922 - With Prince and Harry
Shaw Farm as it looked in the 1920’s – This is the one of the oldest images we have of the barn.



M.L. Shaw 1922 – With Prince and Harry



M.L. Shaw Jr. and George Hoar – This scene from about 1924 shows ML and George on a sleigh. Years later, when the government was collecting metal for WWII, the sleigh went into a bonfire, and the metal was sold for the war effort.



ML Sr. and Annie – Mark Loran Shaw Sr, and his wife, Annie Hutchinson Shaw, in front of the barn. Mid 1920’s.



ML Sr. and Annie – 1928, ML Shaw Sr (b. July 16th, 1866 d. Oct 6th, 1933), ML Shaw Sr (b. July 16th, 1866 d. Oct 6th, 1933), Annie Hutchinson (b. Nov 11th, 1866 d. July 21st, 1961)



1927 – Albert Shaw 20 years old, in front of our 1927 Dodge Brothers truck. It was a one ton, with body by Graham. They called it a Graham Dodge.



1925 – ML Sr. with Prince and the converted Pollards delivery wagon.



Prince pulling the delivery wagon



Lowell Sun article from the 1950’s – Showing the AG Pollard delivery wagon, which became the Shaw Farm Milk Truck.



1929 – ML Sr. in front of a fine crop of corn.



1933 – Winthrop Shaw (12 years old) on tractor, preparing soil to plant corn.



1933 – The farm purchased this used Shaw Duall tractor in 1933. This was the first tractor the farm owned. The spikes in the rear steel wheels made it difficult to maneuver on our rocky soil. And there were no brakes when pulling a load. It was used for one year.





1934 Chevrolet delivery truck.



Drinking from the water well – 1934, Albert Shaw drinking water from the original well on the farm. It was located about 50 feet south of the shed on the end of the barn. The site of the original well was later used as a pig pen.



1935 – Milk Cooling, Raw milk from the cows was cooled on this device. The top tank had clothespins holding flannel. The milk was poured in through the flannel and it was drawn out through a spigot that could regulate the low of milk as it went into the top tray. The tray had small holes. As the milk flowed out, it spread over tubes with cold brine running through them. Milk cans caught the cooled milk, which were then brought to the milk plant for pasteurization and bottling.



1935 – Milk Bottling machine, This large rectangular receiving tank had 12 spigots with rubber grommets on the bottom. It would facilitate a case of milk under it, and when the lever was pulled down, would fill 12 bottles of milk at once.



1935 – Ray Moran and Albert Shaw in front of the milk house with milking cans.



1936 – Winthrop Shaw pulling a “bundle loader” with an F-12 Farm-All, which the farm purchsed new in 1934, replacing the Shaw Duall.



1937 – Albert Shaw with the newest of the fleet, a 1937 International pick up truck.


1937 – Winthrop Shaw on a wagon load of green oats, pulled by a team of horses, Joe and Thearies.



1937 – The summer that this picture was taken was a grueling one. A retaining wall had to be built to facilitate an expected silo, against the steep hill to the back of the barn. The wall is still there today. A storage shed would also be installed, which stood until the constrcution of the new barn in 2002.



1938 Silo – A “Harder” 32 foot silo was installed in one day, early in 1938, by the Harder factory installer, who came from New York to set it up. Notice the pine trees on the hill, behind the barn. These were blown down by the big un-named catagory 3 hurricane of 1938. The timber was collected, brought to a local mill, and the boards were used to build many of the older structures still standing on Shaw farm today.



Albert Shaw – Sharpening a scythe, about 1939



1943 – Mechanized corn cutting, Corn bundle loader cuts the corn, and collects it in 70 pound bundles. The bundles are gathered by hand, and loaded onto a truck.



1943 – collecting bundled corn, Ben Sanford loading corn bundles on the converted flatbed 1937 GMC truck.



Spring 1944 – March 1944 finds ML Sr. and Winthrop Shaw in their new Dodge step-in truck. This was a big improvement over the open bed pick up trucks, which required a heavy quilt be pulled over the milk to keep it from getting warm on the route. The back of the new truck was well insulated.



September 1944 – (L to R) Winthrop Shaw, Eleanor, Virginia (would later marry Winthrop), and ML Jr. on the four tractors used during the war years.





Septerber 23, 1944 – Johnny Huse (left) on our Farm-All Model H, and ML Sr (right) on a Farm-All Model M, gorrowed from Dan Hanson, a feed representative for the local co-op. Dan owned a farm, which we rented to raise heifers and keep our dry cows until they calved.



September 25, 1948 – After the war, real automation came to Shaw Farm. Warren Shaw (Sr.) with a field chopper. This chopper would chop the corn in the field, and had a blower on the back that would blow the chopped corn into the truck. Shown is a 1937 GMC truck.



Warren Shaw Sr. (L), Nancy Shaw (C), Nancy’s brother Richard Kinports (R) – This photo from 1977 shows Warren Sr, along with his wife, Nancy, and her brother, Richard. Richard worked at the farm in the early 1950’s.



1999 Weather Vane on the New Ice Cream stand



1999 Farm store – The farm store, and milk plant, which has served us well for producing and selling milk, ice cream, and other items replaced with a new facility in 2008.



1999 New Ice Cream Stand – we opened our new ice cream stand across the road from the farmhouse and barn. We serve all of the ice cream delights you might expect.



1999 – This scene, featured on our first web site has remained basically unchanged since 1938. See 1938 pictures for comparison.



July 2002 – In the summer of 2002, we tore down the shed attached to the old barn, to make room for the construction of the new barn addition.



Warren, and lifetime friend, Charlie Kleczkowski, watch on as the shed is demolished. Summer 2002.



September 2002 – The construction on the new barn is almost completed.



June 2008 – 100th celebration – We had many special events, hay ride, face painting, and more.



MILK MILK MILK



Ice Cream Freezers in the New Store


2011 Farm Truck



Aerial Shot of the Farm 2010